Study shows teens need help to combat eating disorders

Posted on 2011-05-11 09:28:00 More than a half million teens are affected by eating disorders and showing significant rates of subclinical eating conditions according to a recent article published by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)(link is external).

 

The article referred to an NIMH-funded study which found that symptoms that often lead to the development of an eating disorder can be difficult to diagnose. As a result, many affected teens are going without treatment.

“This shows how important it is for parents and physicians to understand that the symptoms of eating disorders are not always obvious,” said Dr. Tracey Cornella-Carlson, Medical Director of Child and Adolescent Eating Disorder Programs at Rogers Memorial Hospital–Milwaukee. “Fortunately, we know that those who start treatment early on have a far greater chance of maintaining a sustained recovery.”

Co-occurring mental disorders are common
“We are able to provide many levels of supportive care for teens as well as their families, and teach them the skills, such as “thought-challenging” (evidenced-based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy) to help them sustain recovery throughout their lives. With proper, effective treatment early on, long-term recovery can be a reality for them,” said Dr. Cornella-Carlson.

Rogers is home to one of the few inpatient eating disorder programs specifically for children and adolescents in the nation.

 

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